FRIDAY POTPOURRI: BOOK BEGINNINGS & THE FRIDAY 56 — JAN. 11

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Welcome to some bookish fun today as we share Book Beginnings, hosted by Rose City Reader; and as we showcase The Friday 56 with Freda’s Voice.

To join in, just grab a book and share the opening lines…along with any thoughts you wish to give us; then turn to page 56 and excerpt anything on the page.

Then give us the title of the book, so others can add it to their lists!

If you have been wanting to participate, but haven’t yet tried, now is the time!

What better way to spend a Friday?

Today I’ve pulled a book from my ever-growing stacks.  That Old Cape Magic, by Richard Russo, will be my first dive into this author’s work.

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Beginning:  Though the digital clock on the bedside table in his hotel room read 5:17, Jack Griffin, suddenly wide awake, knew he wouldn’t be able to get back to sleep.  He’d allowed himself to drift off too early the night before.  On the heels of wakefulness came an unpleasant realization, that what he hadn’t wanted to admit yesterday, even to himself, was now all too clear in the solitary, predawn dark.

I’m familiar with those feelings!  I wonder what his are about?

***

56:  (One summer, after meeting the next door neighbor’s son)

“Have fun,” his parents said, by which they meant, Leave us in peace.

Except, wait, that wasn’t true, at least not in the beginning.

***

Following Bridge of Sighs—a national best seller hailed by The Boston Globe as “an astounding achievement” and “a masterpiece”—Richard Russo gives us the story of a marriage, and of all the other ties that bind, from parents and in-laws to children and the promises of youth.

Griffin has been tooling around for nearly a year with his father’s ashes in the trunk, but his mother is very much alive and not shy about calling on his cell phone. She does so as he drives down to Cape Cod, where he and his wife, Joy, will celebrate the marriage of their daughter Laura’s best friend. For Griffin this is akin to driving into the past, since he took his childhood summer vacations here, his parents’ respite from the hated Midwest. And the Cape is where he and Joy honeymooned, in the course of which they drafted the Great Truro Accord, a plan for their lives together that’s now thirty years old and has largely come true. He’d left screenwriting and Los Angeles behind for the sort of New England college his snobby academic parents had always aspired to in vain; they’d moved into an old house full of character; and they’d started a family. Check, check and check.

But be careful what you pray for, especially if you manage to achieve it. By the end of this perfectly lovely weekend, the past has so thoroughly swamped the present that the future suddenly hangs in the balance. And when, a year later, a far more important wedding takes place, their beloved Laura’s, on the coast of Maine, Griffin’s chauffeuring two urns of ashes as he contends once more with Joy and her large, unruly family, and both he and she have brought dates along. How in the world could this have happened?

That Old Cape Magic is a novel of deep introspection and every family feeling imaginable, with a middle-aged man confronting his parents and their failed marriage, his own troubled one, his daughter’s new life and, finally, what it was he thought he wanted and what in fact he has. The storytelling is flawless throughout, moments of great comedy and even hilarity alternating with others of rueful understanding and heart-stopping sadness, and its ending is at once surprising, uplifting and unlike anything this Pulitzer Prize winner has ever written.

***

Like most books on my stacks, I picked this one up happily, hoping to read it soon.  And then time passed….

What are you sharing today?  I hope you’ll pop in here and take a peek, and add some comments.

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24 thoughts on “FRIDAY POTPOURRI: BOOK BEGINNINGS & THE FRIDAY 56 — JAN. 11

    • After I read your snippets, I checked my shelves and I don’t have a copy of Goodnight Nobody. I usually buy all the Weiner books I read, and this one didn’t sound familiar. I’m betting that I haven’t read it.

      Thanks for stopping by, Sandra, and I’m glad you liked my excerpts.

      Like

  1. I’ve only read Russo’s first book. Can’t think of the title at the moment. I would love to read this one. The beginning is so smooth and relaxing. I want to go on to find out what he is thinking about.

    Like

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